JAM

Address
Roslagsgatan 14
11355 Stockholm, Sweden
Phone +46 8 673 21 22
E-mail order@jam.se
Website http://www.jam.se


I♥SYNTHS: When did Jam open their doors?

JAM: We first started out as a small used synthesizer store in early 1997.



I♥SYNTHS: What got you interested in selling synthesizers?

JAM: There really wasn’t any business thinking behind it. I just wanted to be around really cool music gear all day, preferably things you had only seen in Peter Forrest’s A-Z of synthesisers or Mark Vails Vintage Synthesizers-book.



I♥SYNTHS: Were you primarily a synth shop and then expanded to other instruments?

JAM: Yes, that’s correct. We have a specialised store for guitars right across the street and a PA-equipment store, just round the corner. JAM Syntotek is specialised in synthesizers (and some studio gear). We are also one of the few stores in Sweden that has both used and new gear, which is sort of how I think a music store should be. It should be fun to visit the store, not like going to your local supermarket.



I♥SYNTHS: What was the coolest synth to walk through the doors?

JAM: Oh, there’s too many, really. We had an original Buchla Music Easel for a day, just visiting from the Royal Music Academy collection. Apart from that, I would say the Technos Acxel (which we’ve had one of before and now just got another one in stock, there’s supposedly less than 40 of them around), the Synton Syrinx Special Edition (super rare, only six made), the super obscure swedish modular Dataton, some EMLs which I am really into and a huge Moog Modular IIc. 

But, the coolest piece of gear will always be the EMU SP1200 sampler for me.



I♥SYNTHS: Do you collect as well, or is everything for sale?

JAM: I do keep gear for my self periodically, but usually everything in the store is for sale.



I♥SYNTHS: What is your rarest synth in the collection?

JAM: At the moment it is the Technis Acxel. We really don’t know how to put a price on it.


I♥SYNTHS: Have you had any celebrity sales? What did they purchase?

JAM: Mostly swedish celebrities, although Daft Punk bought an MaM sequencer in the late nineties. Philippe Zdar, who I really like as a producer, bought a couple of Neumann mikes and turned out to be about the nicest guy we’ve ever met.



I♥SYNTHS: Do you do repairs and maintenance too? 

JAM: Yes, we do. We have a service technician who shares space with us, who is really good at fixing stuff without schematics. We also know most of the repair guys around so, whenever we’re too busy or if it is too hard, we call them in.



I♥SYNTHS: Modular synths have exploded onto the scene in the past few years. Are you noticing more traditional keyboard players getting into it or is this a whole new breed of music makers?

JAM: I would say both, really. There’s these guys who use them only for production, and those who make modular sound just for the activity, I guess. Both is ok in my book. I think the dubstep kids etc are mostly into soft synths though.



I♥SYNTHS: Thanks again for the interview! Care to share some original music or a popular album you’re into at the moment?

JAM: You should always plug your friends so I will have to say, Andreas Tilliander / TM404, his stuff is great, check it out on https://soundcloud.com/tilliander

Also, Smutskatt is a really good swedish beats producer that I tend to play at work a lot http://soundcloud.com/smutskatt

The represses of Eliane Radigues fantastic drone music is also well worth checking out.

Oh, I would also like to plug our instagram account where we put up all the goodies as they come in;
Jam on INSTAGRAM

JAM.se official Webpage

JAM on FACEBOOK