Richard Devine is an electronic producer/sound designer based from Atlanta GA.  His focus is on musical composition, sonic mnemonics, field recording, sound effects and specialized sound design for T.V/Film, web media and video games.



I♥SYNTHS: When did you get into electronic music? Was it a certain musician or piece of gear that got you interested?

Richard Devine: I started getting into electronic music back in high school. I was a DJ at local clubs and raves back in the early 90′s, and became fascinated with making music after hearing a Aphex Twin remix of “Mind stream” EP from Meat Beat Manifesto. At age 17 I started to build up my studio, which around that time was mostly early analog drum machines and synths. I would go to the local pawn shops here in Atlanta every weekend to see what I could find. It was a great time to buy this stuff as it was at a point when no one wanted early analog gear. My first proper synthesizer was the Arp-2600. This was a completely life changing moment for me. I was completely blown away by the semi modular format of the synth. You could also use it to process other sounds via filtering, ring modulation, and spring reverb. I still to this day have and still use the 2600 for my day-to-day projects. It taught me the basic fundamentals of building and shaping a sound from pure synthesis.



I♥SYNTHS: How do you go about recording your hardware?

Richard Devine: I run all my synths/drum machines/modulars into a Yamaha DM2000VCM digital mixing console. It has 56 physical inputs, all running at 24/96khz so it in a way works like a large mixing digital matrix. I have the flexibility to route any channel anywhere I want, and play around with some of my favorite outboard effects units like the Eventide H8000FW, and Lexicon PCM96. Then I have two ADAT optical light pipe cards running 16 channels each digitally to two different sound cards, the RME UFX, and Universal Audio Apollo Quad. I like to switch back and forth between the two for different recording sessions. Everything gets recorded into the computer using either Logic or Nuendo at the end of the day.



I♥SYNTHS: What is your go-to synthesizer when writing music? Is there one synth that defines the Richard Devine sound?

Richard Devine: My go synth would have to be the Nord G2 modular. This is hands down one of my favorite synthesizers. The concept is that its a virtual modular software environment where you can create basically anything you want. You then can assign multiple pages and knobs over the the synthesizer for all your patches. So ahead of its time, and I wish Clavia would bring it back.



I♥SYNTHS: You have a pretty massive collection. Have you ever sold anything and then repurchased it because you missed it?

Richard Devine: Yes, this has happened many times actually, I just recently bought a Roland Jupiter-6 back that I use to own. I bought back the Roland TR-808 drum machine a few years ago, and many other classic machines.



I♥SYNTHS: Do you have a vintage synth you’re still searching for?

Richard Devine: I am still on a hunt to get back the EMS Synthi. It’s another one of my favorites from back in the day. I used the Synth AKS on the first three records I did. I miss that thing, I sold it to buy the Kyma system. The Kyma is great but its no Synthi.

I♥SYNTHS: What happens when you run out of space? Will you move into a bigger space?

Richard Devine: Well, I built a new studio at the beginning of January 2012 which is basically two rooms, one large mix down room and another guest room connected to it. There isn’t any equipment setup in the guest room now but who knows, I might turn it into a modular room of fun at some point.



I♥SYNTHS: Now that you are building modulars, do you use less of the your other keyboard synths or is that more for getting lost in sound design? Do you find it as an obsession?

Richard Devine: I find it to be a bit of both. It can be really inspiring to work on a modular as you have no presets or way of recalling the sounds, exactly the same way, every time. It’s all about doing what you can do in that particular moment in time. Once you pull the patch cables, everything is gone and the ghostly floating electrical voltage of sound disappears forever. I love that. You can’t hold on to anything and over analyze things, like you do with composing on the computer. I like that it’s an entirely different experience then playing on keyboard synths or drum machines. You are basically hunting around for something unexpected and interesting. I am often trying to find something I haven’t heard before with the modulars. It’s interesting that no two systems will ever be the same. Everybody will build their system to fit their needs. I have felt that the modular is an amazing platform for creating new sounds effects. It’s also insanely fun to use, which is why it’s so addictive. It definitely has turned into a bit of a obsession lately and has been for the last 6 years.



I♥SYNTHS: Are you ever overwhelmed by your collection?

Richard Devine: I’ve actually sold and got rid of a lot a gear when I built up the new studio. I just held onto the key pieces of kit that I like to use on projects and for my own work. I think I got rid of like, 20 keyboards or something. I wanted to really clean up my work space and go for a more minimal open feel. I realized over the years that I work much better with less. I like to see what I can get using just a few minimal pieces of kit rather then trying to use everything at once. I found that I write the best things using almost nothing these days.



I♥SYNTHS: Speaking of sound design, I know you’ve actually built patches for some major synthesizer companies. What synths have you worked on and do you have a favorite?

Richard Devine: Lets see, I have worked on a bunch so I will just list a few of my favorites. Alesis SR-18, Alesis Fusion, Access Virus TI/T2, Akai MPC-5000 (internal synthesizer patches), Arturia Origin, Dave Smith Tempest, and Prophet 12 keyboards. The Korg Legacy Collection, Radius and Korg Oasis keyboard. Clavia Nord Modular G2, and NL4. Elektron Music Machines, Analog 4, and Octatrack. Hartmann Neuron synthesizer (rip), Moog Little Phatty, Sub Phatty, and Animoog. The Roland Gaia, and Vsynth/GT. Out of the bunch I would say the Nord G2 and the new Nord Lead 4 are my two favorites. The Nord Lead 4 is an amazing keyboard. I just finished my artist sound bank for them.

You can download it for free from the Clavia site here:
http://www.nordkeyboards.com/main.asp?tm=Sound%20Libraries&cllibr=Product_Libraries&cplib=Nord_Lead_4

Listen to the demo using only sounds from my NL4 bank:

https://soundcloud.com/nordkeyboards/devine-demo-v2



I♥SYNTHS: What is your weirdest sounding instrument? Have you used it on any recordings?

Richard Devine: I’m not sure I would classify this as instruments but a sound maker. I would have to say the weirdest sounds I have gotten have been from nature. I go out and do a lot of field recording for different design projects. I am always fascinated and surprised by the sounds I find in the most common places. I do a lot of under water recording using my hydrophones and I like recording various animals, from birds and bats to aquatic life and insects. Here are a few recordings from my personal collection featured on sound cloud:

Hydrophone Recording of Burning Embers Underwater:

Multichannel field recording of 12,000 bees at Buckeye Creek Farm:

Hydrophone Recordings of Dolphins, Shrimp Feeding, and Hypostomus Plecostomus Fish:

Eerie Recording of Tornado Sirens:

The Sound of Data Transmissions-Electromagnetic Fields:


I♥SYNTHS: Are there any circuit bent instruments you like to work with?

Richard Devine: Yes, I have a few speak n spells that Ivo from “Glitch Machines” circuit bent for me. He also did a wicked bend on a Casio SK-5 keyboard with joystick controls, called the “Logic Bomb”. One of my favorite circuit bent machines is the “Glitch Desk” by “Highly Liquid”. It’s basically a 50-patch point sequencer that uses banana cables. You are sequencing each stage in real-time and also bending the circuits at the same time. It also has MIDI capabilities so you can clock and sequence to your computer, really helpful. 



I♥SYNTHS: What’s next for Richard Devine? Any new songs, albums or projects you’d like to share?

Richard Devine: I am working on a all-new modular album for 2014. I have already recorded over 90 tracks so far. I just need to compile them into something that will be ready for a release. I am just now finishing up a remix for Douglas J. McCarthy of Nitzer Ebb and Cyrus Rex’s new project called “DJM REX” of this track called “Retreat”, and another remix to be released by BossFYTE from Canada in 2014. 

My last album “RISP” was released on “Detroit Underground” records and was my first chapter recording using the new modular systems.

Here is a preview to the title track “Plonked Spectral” of the album, visuals by Dmas3:

Plonked Spectral Video from the “RiSP-CD” 2012 from Richard Devine on Vimeo.

Here is a link to the entire track on Soundcloud

Shortly after that, I released my first all modular recordings using the MakeNoise modular shared system for MakeNoise Records.

I released an extended version of one of the pieces on Soundcloud here:

Here are two other remixes I recently released there:

Remix for Annie Hall’s Random Paraphilia EP

Transform Trailer for Twisted Tools:

Richard Devine OFFICIAL WEBSITE

Richard Devine on SOUNDCLOUD

Richard Devine on FACEBOOK

Richard Devine on TWITTER

Address
Roslagsgatan 14
11355 Stockholm, Sweden
Phone +46 8 673 21 22
E-mail order@jam.se
Website http://www.jam.se


I♥SYNTHS: When did Jam open their doors?

JAM: We first started out as a small used synthesizer store in early 1997.



I♥SYNTHS: What got you interested in selling synthesizers?

JAM: There really wasn’t any business thinking behind it. I just wanted to be around really cool music gear all day, preferably things you had only seen in Peter Forrest’s A-Z of synthesisers or Mark Vails Vintage Synthesizers-book.



I♥SYNTHS: Were you primarily a synth shop and then expanded to other instruments?

JAM: Yes, that’s correct. We have a specialised store for guitars right across the street and a PA-equipment store, just round the corner. JAM Syntotek is specialised in synthesizers (and some studio gear). We are also one of the few stores in Sweden that has both used and new gear, which is sort of how I think a music store should be. It should be fun to visit the store, not like going to your local supermarket.



I♥SYNTHS: What was the coolest synth to walk through the doors?

JAM: Oh, there’s too many, really. We had an original Buchla Music Easel for a day, just visiting from the Royal Music Academy collection. Apart from that, I would say the Technos Acxel (which we’ve had one of before and now just got another one in stock, there’s supposedly less than 40 of them around), the Synton Syrinx Special Edition (super rare, only six made), the super obscure swedish modular Dataton, some EMLs which I am really into and a huge Moog Modular IIc. 

But, the coolest piece of gear will always be the EMU SP1200 sampler for me.



I♥SYNTHS: Do you collect as well, or is everything for sale?

JAM: I do keep gear for my self periodically, but usually everything in the store is for sale.



I♥SYNTHS: What is your rarest synth in the collection?

JAM: At the moment it is the Technis Acxel. We really don’t know how to put a price on it.


I♥SYNTHS: Have you had any celebrity sales? What did they purchase?

JAM: Mostly swedish celebrities, although Daft Punk bought an MaM sequencer in the late nineties. Philippe Zdar, who I really like as a producer, bought a couple of Neumann mikes and turned out to be about the nicest guy we’ve ever met.



I♥SYNTHS: Do you do repairs and maintenance too? 

JAM: Yes, we do. We have a service technician who shares space with us, who is really good at fixing stuff without schematics. We also know most of the repair guys around so, whenever we’re too busy or if it is too hard, we call them in.



I♥SYNTHS: Modular synths have exploded onto the scene in the past few years. Are you noticing more traditional keyboard players getting into it or is this a whole new breed of music makers?

JAM: I would say both, really. There’s these guys who use them only for production, and those who make modular sound just for the activity, I guess. Both is ok in my book. I think the dubstep kids etc are mostly into soft synths though.



I♥SYNTHS: Thanks again for the interview! Care to share some original music or a popular album you’re into at the moment?

JAM: You should always plug your friends so I will have to say, Andreas Tilliander / TM404, his stuff is great, check it out on https://soundcloud.com/tilliander

Also, Smutskatt is a really good swedish beats producer that I tend to play at work a lot http://soundcloud.com/smutskatt

The represses of Eliane Radigues fantastic drone music is also well worth checking out.

Oh, I would also like to plug our instagram account where we put up all the goodies as they come in;
Jam on INSTAGRAM

JAM.se official Webpage

JAM on FACEBOOK



Dallas Campbell: is a synth nerd and general gear fanatic from West Virginia, USA. He has been in many music project over the years, usually playing bass and or vocals. Over the past 12 months, he has focused more on making electronic music. Drawing influence from the sounds of the late 70s and early 80s, Dallas continues to obsess about hardware and sometimes even finds the time to record a track or two



I♥SYNTHS: Tell us a little about your music project and how you go about recording.

Dallas Campbell: My music project is really just me messing around while my family is sleeping. I don’t usually have any goals or anything, I will just pick a synth I haven’t used in a while and start programming a patch until I get an idea, then hit record and play something. Generally, I’ll write most of the song with one synth and I’ll go back and replace a lot of the parts with other synths or bass. Then, I’ll write the drums. Last, I’ll send all of the instrument and drum tracks to external fx gear, which is a total pain right now because i only have two inputs so, I have to do every take one at a time. It’s not efficient, to say the least.



I♥SYNTHS: In a world filled with virtual instruments, what draws you to hardware?

Dallas Campbell: Glutton for punishment? haha Virtual synths just never worked very well for me. Other people are great with them, but I’m just more inspired by an actual piece of hardware that I can touch. It’s kinda cool to ponder all the shit these 30-year-old pieces of technology must have been through!



I♥SYNTHS: When did you start collecting gear and what is your prized possession?

Dallas Campbell: This dude I knew in college let my roommate and I borrow a four track cassette recorder. I was pretty much hooked on gear and music after that. I started buying synths about 10 or so years ago. I’m guessing the rarest thing I have is a Yamaha SY20. I don’t think it was ever released outside of Japan. All the writing on the synth is in Japanese! My favorite synth is probably my SCI Pro-One for mono and the Korg Polysix for poly. As for favorite fx units, I would say the Dimension D Chorus, Multivox Multiecho Delay, the Eventide Space Reverb, and the Roland SBF-325 flanger.



I♥SYNTHS: I see you are also a bass player? Did you start playing before or after getting into synthesizers?

Dallas Campbell: Yeah, bass is fun. I had been playing it in some Screamo/Metal bands years ago, before i got into synths. Actually, i bought a Roland Alpha Juno to use in the metal band, that’s when I started learning more about what the heck a synthesizer was.



I♥SYNTHS: What is your favorite synth for bass tones?

Dallas Campbell: Thats a tough one, i have a few pretty sweet bass synths. The one that really stands out and impresses me almost every time is the Roland SH-09. The deep low bass tones you can get with that thing are ridiculous.



I♥SYNTHS: Do you mostly you use keyboard synthesizers or do you use rack gear as well?

Dallas Campbell: Oh, I love rack gear too, I’d actually prefer all my synths to be racks just to save space!



I♥SYNTHS: Do you rearrange your gear a lot to create a better workflow and do you have any future plans to build a bigger room?

Dallas Campbell: I spend probably half of my time moving gear around while I’m recording. I don’t have anything wired right now so I’m moving synths every time I record a track, it’s slightly tedious. I plan on moving to a bigger space at some point in the future, because not having to move 10 things just to get like a bell sound or something would be incredible!



I♥SYNTHS: Have your kids shown an interest in all of the pretty knobs and lights?

Dallas Campbell: For sure! My daughter is obsessed with banging on the keys and turning the knobs. I usually pull up some VST synth and let her bang away on my midi controller.



I♥SYNTHS: What’s next on your list? Are there any rare synths you’ve been looking for?

Dallas Campbell: The quest for gear is never ending! I’ve been wanting an OB8 or OBX for a while, but damn those prices these days are not nice. Oh yeah, maybe a Jupiter 4 to compliment my ProMars! I’ve also considered starting a modular, but i fear that would open up a whole new can of worms to be obsessed about!



I♥SYNTHS: We’d love to hear some of your music. Is there anything you’d like to leave us with?

Dallas Campbell: I’m currently writing a couple EPs that are synth based. The material sounds a bit like the last couple tracks I did for a compilation and an online comic book.



Dallas Campbell: Also, last week my friend Geoff Hoskinson directed and edited an awesome video for one of my tracks called “Return to Earth” and I have a bunch of other tracks up on my soundcloud.


Dallas Campbell – “Return to Earth” from Geoff Hoskinson on Vimeo.

Dallas Campbell on SOUNDCLOUD

Dallas Campbell on FACEBOOK

Dallas Campbell on TUMBLR


RetroSound is the German-based musician and vintage synthesizer geek, Marko Ettlich. He is a publisher of a popular vintage synthesizer channel on YouTube and an author for different music magazines.



I♥SYNTHS: What kind of music do you listen to?

RetroSound: I am a child of the 80s and I love the music from Depeche Mode, The Human League, Talk Talk, Propaganda, The Fixx and other bands from this time. But, I also like electronic music with guitars like the french band, Phoenix.



I♥SYNTHS: Who is your favorite synthesizer player and what is your favorite synthesizer company?

RetroSound: Vangelis has a big influence of my musical work since I know what synthesizers were used. I heard the futuristic tunes in the late 70s and I was completely blown away. I have a lot of vintage Roland synthesizers so, those are probably my favorite.



I♥SYNTHS: What is your favorite synthesizer that you can’t live without?

RetroSound: My absolute favorite synthesizer ever is the Oberheim OB-X (not the later OB-Xa). The raw sound and the power is pure sex. It’s really the best!



I♥SYNTHS: Do you use any computer-based soft synthesizers and how would you compare them to the real thing?

RetroSound: I use only hardware stuff. Software synths are not part of my world.

I♥SYNTHS: When did you start collecting synthesizers and do you normally buy them on eBay or from other musicians/collectors?

RetroSound: I started collecting in the mid 90s. Some synths are from eBay or local markets and some are from other musicians.



I♥SYNTHS: You’re videos are fantastic and you seem to have a large following. What made you decide to start this project?

RetroSound: Thank you! I started the vintage synthesizer demo project back in January 2007. Good demo videos were very rare at the beginning of YouTube and I wanted to share the fantastic sound possibilities of the older hardware in a time full of software synths.



I♥SYNTHS: What do you think is your rarest synthesizer?

RetroSound: The PPG wave 2.2 with the Waveterm A . Only 500 were made by Wolfgang Palm



I♥SYNTHS: What are your thoughts on new synthesizers that have come out recently? Are there any you have your eye on or do you prefer to stick with the vintage stuff?

RetroSound: I miss a lot on new synths. I’ve compared new MOOGs with the old ones but, the sound is not the same. I miss the raw, dirty sounds and the colours. Most of today’s synth sounds are very clean and boring to me after a few days.



I♥SYNTHS: Would you like to share a new song or video with us today?

RetroSound: Check out some of my newer songs on my SoundCloud page: Retro Sound on Soundcloud


RetroSound Official Homepage

RetroSound on YouTube

RetroSound on Facebook

RetroSound Blog

RetroSound New Album Trailer


Inspired by 80’s synth pop, disco, new wave music and a love for analog synths, musician/producer Shawn Ward created FM Attack and released the debut album “Dreamatic” in 2009 on Tonite Records. The album was received with critical acclaim, leading to remixes for artists including Pnau, Edwin Van Cleef, Super Mal, Sally Shapiro, Tesla Boy, Visitor, Trans-X and Richard Marx. Fm Attack recently signed a worldwide publishing deal with Chrysalis Music and released a new album “Deja Vu”



I♥SYNTHS: Tell us a little about your music project. Does the name of your project come from fm synthesis?

FM Attack: I came up with the name because I wanted to do a synthpop project that had a nostalgic sound, but with a futuristic vision. I wanted something with an underground electronic feel that could crossover onto fm radio.



I♥SYNTHS: What synthesizers do you currently own?

FM Attack: Too many! I’m running out of room. My favorites are the Minimoog, Roland D-550, Arp Solina, Jupiter 8, Prophet 5 and I’m really digging this DIY Sid Synth, I picked up that has two C64 synth chips in it.



I♥SYNTHS: How do you go about recording your hardware equipment and what’s your go-to synthesizer when writing music?

FM Attack: I track and sequence all of the synths, vocals and guitar through my Toft mixing board to give them an extra warm sound. Sometimes, I also run them through a great EQ (API 5500) and or put them through a light setting on the Distressor compressors.



I♥SYNTHS: If you were stuck on an island with one synth from your collection, what would you bring?

FM Attack: That’s a tough question. I think I would probably go with the Sequential Circuits Prophet 5



I♥SYNTHS: What’s your dream synthesizer?

FM Attack: I’ve always wanted a Yamaha CS80

I♥SYNTHS: Any other goodies you want to share with us?

FM Attack: Yes! My mini Galaxian video game system.



I♥SYNTHS: Any new songs or albums to show off the FM Attack sound?

FM Attack: I just released a new LP called “Deja Vu”. It’s inspired by 80s movie soundtracks, italo disco and new wave music. I’ve always wanted to do an album of original songs, not using samples.

I♥SYNTHS: Thanks again for the interview and sweet collection!


You can hear more of FM Attack‘s new album and his other releases below…

Deja Vu LP
BUY ON iTunes
BUY CDs, Cassettes, 12″ Vinyl

Astrowave EP
BUY ON iTunes

Dreamatic LP
BUY ON iTunes

FM Attack ONLINE
FM Attack on SOUNDCLOUD

FM Attack on BANDCAMP

FM Attack on FACEBOOK

Photo Credit: Diego Garcia